The Early and Periodic Screening and Diagnostic Testing (EPSDT) Program provides age-specific standards for preventive and primary care services for Medicaid-eligible children. To monitor compliance with program requirements, the state of Maryland commissions a team of nurses to conduct annual record reviews of a sample of certified providers. The Hilltop Institute (as the Center for Health Program Development and Management) carried out an inter-rater reliability evaluation to assess the consistency of nurses’ ratings.

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On behalf of the Partnership for a Healthier Carroll County, Inc., The Hilltop Institute (as the Center for Health Program Development and Management) conducted an assessment of community strengths and needs for Carroll County, Maryland. The assessment consisted of a review of secondary data sources, key stakeholder interviews, and a comprehensive survey of households in the county. This report focuses on findings from key stakeholders.

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As Medicaid managed care programs mature, states are looking to refine their methods for measuring and improving the performance of participating health plans. This report serves as a guide for Medicaid agencies who want to develop a performance measurement program using administrative data to evaluate the care provided to enrollees with chronic diseases. The report identifies potential performance indicators that are associated with improved medical outcomes and demonstrates the application of diagnosis-based risk adjustment to performance measurement by profiling six health plans.

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This presentation summarizes the methodology for the community strengths and needs assessment that The Hilltop Institute (as the Center for Health Program Development and Management) conducted for Carroll County, Maryland. Survey findings related to the health, education, and well-being of the county’s children are presented in a series of charts and graphs.

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A major challenge to expanding home- and community-based services (HCBS) alternatives to institutional long-term care is finding funding sources to pay for HCBS. Unless states can develop policy interventions that actually reduce expenditures in institutional settings, any expansion in HCBS requires new state funds. This issue brief presents several approaches states can use to reduce nursing facility utilization and expenditures in order to make funds available to expand HCBS.

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In planning for long-term care, adults take into consideration both the place of care and the persons to provide care. In this study, 1,500 adults aged 40-70 were surveyed about future long-term care needs and their preferences for care setting and caregivers.

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On behalf of the Maryland AIDS Administration, The Hilltop Institute (as the Center for Health Program Development and Management) conducted a needs assessment of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Maryland American Indians concerning HIV/AIDS education, screening and testing, and treatment. Findings represent the views of more than 250 respondents with 37 tribal affiliations. This report provides insights on how the Maryland AIDS Administration and Maryland’s American Indians might work together to improve efforts to decrease the spread of HIV/AIDS.

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In July 2001, Maryland introduced a premium for participation in the Maryland Children’s Health Program for children in families with incomes between 201 and 300 percent of the federal poverty level. This study examines the effect of the premium on program enrollment.

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A survey of elderly residents of an urban public housing complex helped area providers design a preliminary model for better coordination of services in order to enable elderly residents to age in place. This project was funded by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) as part of the Service Access for Elders in Public Housing initiative.

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Beginning in 2001, Maryland offered premium assistance to subsidize employer-sponsored insurance for children eligible for the Maryland Children’s Health Program established under the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The General Assembly subsequently voted to discontinue premium assistance in 2003. This report examines Maryland ‘s experience with the premium assistance program, discussing employer participation, enrollee participation, and program cost-effectiveness.

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Hilltop continues to work remotely, so please reach us by email. You can find our team members’ email addresses by going to their bios located on the Teams page of our website.